A new @SterKinekor cinema on the @JoburgRedBus route!

STER-KINEKOR BRINGS BIG SCREEN ACTION TO NEWTOWN JUNCTION WITH SIX STATE-OF-THE-ART CINEMAS, fabulously situated on the Joburg Red Bus route!

Ster-Kinekor cinema
New innovations ensure ‘Great Moments at their Greatest’ with every cinema visit…

South Africa’s leading cinema chain is set to open another new site this week, as it continues to cater for the ever-growing cinema-going audience across the country. On Friday, 31 October, Ster-Kinekor Theatres will open the doors of its latest state-of-the-art, six-cinema complex in the newly-completed Newtown Junction shopping complex in Newtown, Johannesburg.

The new cinema complex at Newtown Junction, which has 761 seats across the six cinemas, ensures that movie-lovers based in and around the CBD and Newtown areas of Johannesburg experience ‘Great Moments at their Greatest’ on the big screen. The new Ster-Kinekor cinemas boast the very latest in digital projector technology, offering crystal clear images and quality surround sound speaker systems. Included in the mix of cinemas are two 3D-ready screens to show the latest film releases produced in this larger-than-life format.

In addition to the latest digital projection technology, this complex also boasts another innovation for Ster-Kinekor – the introduction of self-service catering terminals. Patrons can order snacks and make a payment, before proceeding to the catering counter to collect their order.

Fiaz Mahomed, CEO of Ster-Kinekor Theatres, explains: “Our key focus with the introduction of this exciting new technology is to streamline operations at the site, by placing the power of choice directly in the hands of our customers. The system offers a simple and efficient user experience with a faster transaction time. We are trialling this new technology here at Newtown, in addition to our newly-opened sites at Forest Hill in Centurion and Matlosana Mall in Klerksdorp, to monitor its performance before deciding how best to roll this out to our other complexes.

“When we introduced our unique self-service ticket terminals (SSTs) more than eight years ago, we noticed an immediate and significant reduction in queue times for our customers. We are optimistic that the catering terminals will have as great an impact in offering our customers a seamless experience when buying their tickets and snacks, before entering the cinema to sit back and enjoy the latest blockbuster on the big screen,” states Mahomed.

Another exciting new feature at the Newtown site is the versatility of Cinema 1, which is more than a venue to screen the latest films. With the installation of specialist sound and lighting infrastructure and staging equipment, this 252-seater theatre can be transformed into the perfect space to host live stage events such as stand-up comedy and conferences.

“In fact, as part of the recent Absa ‘Joburg City Festival’ at the beginning of October, the venue was used successfully to host one of the events: the comedy show featuring Loyiso Gola and Friends,” comments Mahomed.

“For Ster-Kinekor, it is a particular privilege to be part of the regeneration of the Johannesburg CBD, and Newtown in particular. Newtown has become popular as a vibrant work and recreational area with a unique character based on existing cultural facilities. What we are offering here with the new Ster-Kinekor complex at Newtown Junction will, we believe, both benefit and enhance the existing infrastructure and entertainment facilities.

“The magic of the big screen cinema experience cannot be replicated in any other format. We are seeing evidence of this as audiences continue to visit the cinema to watch new releases and appreciate the big blockbuster films in the way they were made to be viewed – on the big screen. With the latest blockbusters releasing each week and six state-of-the-art cinemas in which to watch them, we are confident that audiences who enjoy a ‘great moment’ at one of our cinemas in Newtown will certainly be back for more,” concludes Mahomed.

Regular movie-goers can also enjoy further benefits and discounts through membership of the various loyalty programmes associated with Ster-Kinekor – the SK Club, Discovery Vitality and Edgars Club. For instant access to find out what’s new, which films are releasing when, and to make a booking, mobile phone users can also download the SK App on their Nokia, Samsung Android, iPhone or Blackberry smart phones – and have all the information they need at the touch of a button.

The films releasing at Ster-Kinekor Newtown Junction from Friday, 31 October, include two films in 3D suitable for the whole family – Planes: Fire & Rescue and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, as well as the crime thriller Gone Girl starring Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike, the action-packed The Equalizer, Happy New Year from Bollywood, and the psychological thriller, Eliza Graves.

The opening of Ster-Kinekor Newtown follows on the successful launch of five other new sites within the past year – Secunda Mall in Secunda, Cradlestone Mall near Krugersdorp, The Grove Mall in Pretoria East, Forest Hill City in Centurion and the opening last week of Matlosana Mall in Klerksdorp. A number of other new sites are scheduled to open within the next year.

In addition to the new site openings, Ster-Kinekor has also focused on upgrading the cinema viewing experience at some of its key venues. These include the addition of luxurious Cine Prestige cinemas at four sites – Cradlestone Mall, Gateway, The Grove Mall and Sandton, with the imminent launch of two more at Cavendish in Cape Town, as well as the launch of two impressive IMAX® theatres at Gateway and The Grove Mall. More openings are scheduled within the next few months.

For more information about Ster-Kinekor Newtown Junction, or to book tickets, visit: http://www.sterkinekor.com or call Ticketline on 0861-Movies (668 437). For news and updates, go to Facebook: Ster-Kinekor Theatres | Follow Ster-Kinekor on Twitter: @sterkinekor, or download the SK App on your Nokia, Samsung Android, iPhone or Blackberry smart phone for updates or to book from your mobile phone.

Ster-Kinekor Theatres is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Primedia Group and is the largest movie exhibitor on the African continent. To most South Africans, the word ‘movies’ is synonymous with the name ‘Ster-Kinekor’. The company operates 54 commercial cinema complexes in South Africa, with five international sites based in Lesotho, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The cinema chain’s sites house more than 400 large-scale screens, over 64 000 seats and the largest 3D footprint featuring more than 120 state-of-the-art 3D screens across the country. As the industry leader, Ster-Kinekor has pioneered cinema concepts such as Cinema Nouveau, one of the world’s largest dedicated art-house multiplex circuits, and the luxurious Cine Prestige theatres, the first ‘business class’ cinema experience in South Africa. It boasts the only cinema on the continent that is fitted with the advanced Dolby Atmos sound system (at Gateway in Durban), and has spearheaded the return of The IMAX® Experience, with the opening of IMAX® Theatres at Gateway in 2013 and The Grove in June 2014. As one of South Africa’s most loved brands, it is Ster-Kinekor’s ongoing mission to become synonymous with the unrivalled magic of the cinema experience, by providing ‘Great Moments at Their Greatest’. During 2013, the company embarked on a massive roll-out project to convert and equip every cinema with the very latest in digital projection and sound technology. The result of this upgrade is that every cinema now boasts state-of-the-art cinema technology that encompasses 2K and 4K digital projection and 5.1 and 7.1 surround sound systems. The award-winning SK App, which is downloadable on all smart phone operating systems, is interactive, user-friendly and feature-rich, and recently recorded its 1.5-millionth download. The new-look SK Club loyalty programme rewards members with redeemable points when they swipe their card when buying movie tickets or catering. Combined with industry leading loyalty programmes from Edcon and Discovery Vitality, these give Ster-Kinekor a strong consumer value proposition and competitive advantage. As the market leader, Ster-Kinekor aims to spearhead the advancement of cinema across both South Africa and the rest of Africa, to ensure that consumers continue to experience movies as they were made to be seen – on the big screen.
See more at: http://www.sterkinekor.com.

ABOUT THE STER-KINEKOR LOYALTY PROGRAMMES:
The three loyalty programmes linked to Ster-Kinekor also offer a number of price discounts and benefits, as outlined above:
• SK Club Loyalty Programme:
• SK CLUB members pay half-price for movies every Tuesday (All day. All movies). Members also earn 100pts for each movie ticket purchased (Every day. All movies). They can double their points on Thursday (All day. All movies) or by purchasing a ticket for the SKC Must See Movie. SK Club members can also earn points when purchasing catering combos: up to 200pts on a SK CLUB combo purchased and 200pts for the Must See Movie combo. FREE MOVIE = 1000pts!
• Discovery Vitality Movie Club:
• Vitality members get a discount on movie tickets for all shows every day, countrywide. Discovery Kids under 18 watch movies for free before 19:00 (Every day. All movies)
• Edgars Movie Club:
• Edgars members get up to 60% discount on up two movie tickets per day (Every day. All movies)
As you can see from the above, these three loyalty programmes work independently from each other: i.e. you do not have to be a Discovery Vitality member to join the SK Club. You can belong to all three loyalty programmes for optimum benefits and discounts.

A writer is a world trapped in a person.

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Dear friends and other interesting creatures,

Imagine your mind having too many tabs open. There is not one subject I have dealt with where I can just close the tab.  All that is happening is that my emotional hard drive is over heating. Your screen turns blue. Sounds hot hey?  :)

I love my Social Media Diva tab.  The diverse people I meet,  the depth of subjects I am exposed to and the satisfaction is personable when acknowledged.

It truly is an extension of self for me since I don’t wear masks well, and pretending is for those who need to fake it to convince themselves they made it. 

My gratitude to clients who keep seeking me out on a platform there are a number to choose from. Contacts who will share information because they believe you would meet a need (sometimes if only your own!) and friendships freely given and received. Many,  many sincere,  good people in this world even if at times you look around and it appears Halloween all year round!
Thankful to those who see the value lies in who I am, and what I do with it. You adapt to your clients needs / wants but your core needs to remain intact or the world will swallow you whole. No chewing,  gargle or spitting.

Oh God knows there has been times I have wanted to smother my dear husband as like most of us normal folk,  he can be a pain in the ass. 

However in the man’s defence, in reality I am a loud,  opinionated,  probably not medicated enough individual with a temper to match.  Act first.  Think later.  That said,  one quality I am very proud of is that if I believe I have wronged anyone,  I apologise.  Without prejudice if it pleases the court.

After googling (my doctor would want to shoot me now) my husbands diagnosis of Bell’s Palsy on Saturday,  I have read accounts of full recovery and tales of sorrow. Everyone is different. Everyone has a story to tell. I do pray for divine intervention and that he will be completely healed. It is a stressful time.  His headache on the affected side is not moving and causing us both concern. 

When that screen turned blue and asked me to continue on safe mode, with my husband connected to drips and an ECG I knew that I did not want to loose him.  He had to be okay. I love him very much.

As for me,  I am generally in good health desbite the Fibromyalgia and Ankolysing Spondylitis nonsense.  I have a bit of an annoying iron deficiency which isn’t responding to meds,  so the medical profession does not yet know what my body has against iron.  The main draw back is that I am incredibly tired.  Physically.  Even taking it easy,  actually getting up is met with exhaustion. Let’s just say I have been trying to do grocery shopping since last week Thursday…. It is now Wednesday.

Banting is going well.  Husband joined me three weeks ago.  He has had no Coke (the drinking kind) since, so I am very HUGELY proud of him.  In am going into my 5th month now.  I am even baking bread,  chocolate mousse and crust less quiche so it has awaken the cooking person I have tried to keep in a tower.  No Prince for that Rapunzel but banting has freed her. 

We need a spa DAY or a weekend in the country. #justsaying

Many exciting projects happening.  Keep up with my Twitter and Facebook.  :)

I have no desire to be Jonah in the fish with a candle. I would have chosen the flying magic carpet in Aladin.  Much more windswept and exotic. So climb up…  We have a world to see,  people to meet and whips to crack.

I wish you enough,
Wenchy

PS. My main aim is to go and buy groceries today.  That would be like an achievement right?  :)

Posted from the second cloud on your left.

In memory of David Kato.Ugandan Gay rights activist @FATCT_SA @UJArtsCentre #H28

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LOVE IN A TIME OF HAMMERS
In memory of David Kato – Ugandan Gay rights activist
We need love like we need water. We need our humanity like we need air.
“Would I choose to be gay if know I’ll be minority, and be pounded for it?”
This piece explores love, acceptance, and an assortment of mad contradictions in a crucial frontier for human rights on the African continent.

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This new work created in collaboration with Forgotten Angle, co-devised by the cast, explores the personal and political conditions in which lesbian, bisexual, gay or transgender people live in Africa. Using the situation in Uganda as a starting point, the intention is to create work that challenges homophobic perceptions, as manifested in many African countries, and draw attention to the political ramifications for human rights in general.
In February 2014 Uganda passed a new anti-homosexuality bill which toughened penalties for gay people. Initially, the proposed bill included the death penalty for ‘repeat offenders’ and ‘aggravated’ homosexual acts, and imprisonment for those found guilty of not reporting gay people to the police.
“Homosexuality is just bad behaviour that should not be allowed in our society”
David Bahati, the MP who introduced the bill which included the death penalty in Uganda.

Public support for the death penalty was and is still believed to be widespread. This was whipped up by a frenzied media campaign to ‘out’ and shame gay people, and bolstered by Evangelical Christian Americans whose anti-gay campaigning has been persistent in recent years. This has included the presentation of a petition to the Ugandan parliament claiming homosexuals are responsible for mass recruitment of young people and children into the ‘practice.’

In 2011, whilst the ‘Kill the Gays’ Bill was being tabled, Uganda’s Rolling Stone newspaper published the photographs of several people it said were gay with the headline “Hang them”. After the gay rights activist David Kato took the Rolling Stone to court, successfully suing the paper, he was bludgeoned to death with a hammer. Police found no connection. But many believe his death was the result of vigilante gay-bashing.
David Kato was a spirited activist, with a vibrant and brave approach to his work and life. He dreamed of turning his mother’s cassava farm into a gay village, whilst his society wished him dead.
Should a person’s sexuality be controlled by the state? Is an individual’s sexuality the business of society to determine? How can minority rights be understood by a majority? How can dance expression and story work to encourage tolerance? What can South Africa do to support the battle for minority rights in the rest of Africa? What changes do we want to bring about? What story, which images will help us bring about change?
These are some of the questions our process seeks to address, and intends to create a production relevant to a South African audience. David Kato’s story is the starting point to finding story and expression of cultural resistance.
When conceived the process aimed to include a combination of:
• Internalizing real experiences of people who are struggling with homophobia, persecution, LGBTI activism in the African context – including drawing upon testimony from activists, sexual-minority migrants, Diaspora residing in South Africa.
• Finding physical expression and an aesthetic for the journey towards destruction which follows extreme intolerance.
• Finding physical expression and an ‘experience’ that reflects the beauty of diversity.
• Questioning how space, aesthetic and ritual can be used to reflect the dehumanizing, brainwashing impact of discrimination.
The work is being made with a life after the 5 week residency in mind, with onward touring to professional venues and educational and/or community settings.

Choreographed By: Mcintosch Jurahuni (Zimbabwe)

Directed by Melissa Eveleigh (UK/Zimbabwe/Malawi)

Music: Dave Carey (UK)

Performed by Nosi Samenete, Thulani Chauke, Thabo Kobeli, Nicholas Aphane, Charlston van Rooyen

Design: Sasha Ehlers

Lighting Design: Thabo Pule

Produced by The Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative

H28 is the lead dance production of THATSOQUEER 2014 (#TSQ) and is made possible with generous financial assistance and support from RMB, Pro Helvetia Swiss Arts Council and Business and Arts South Africa. #TSQ is presented by UJ Arts & Culture in partnership with UJ LIBERATI, UJFM 95.4, Gay and Lesbian Memory in Action (GALA), the Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative (FATC) and WHAM! Mambaonline is the official media partner of #TSQ.

H28 – Love in a time of hammers will be staged in Johannesburg at the Con Cowan Theatre. There will be three performances only – 30 October at 7.30pm, 31 October at 7.30pm and 1 November at 3pm. Tickets cost R50 and can be booked via pj@forgottenangle.co.za or purchased at the door.

Please note there is an age restriction of 16 years and under.

For more details visit www.forgottenangle.co.za or find the FATC on facebook.

“Would I choose to be gay if know I’ll be minority, and be pounded for it?” @FATCT_SA @UJArtsCentre #H28

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H28 – Love in a time of hammers will be staged in Johannesburg at the Con Cowan Theatre. There will be three performances only – 30 October at 7.30pm, 31 October at 7.30pm and 1 November at 3pm. Tickets cost R50 and can be booked via pj@forgottenangle.co.za or purchased at the door.

Please note there is an age restriction of 16 years and under.

For more details visit www.forgottenangle.co.za or find the FATC on facebook.

Since its inception in January 1995 FATC has enjoyed an extremely busy and prolific career. FATC has been instrumental in collaborating with an extensive number of South Africa’s leading contemporary dance and theatre professionals (including Greg Maqoma, Shanell Winlock, Sello Pessa, Moeketsi Koena, Athena Mazarakis, Craig Morris, Gys DeVilliers, David Minaar, Jennifer Ferguson, Neli Xaba, Boyzie Cekwana, Gladys Agulhus, Timoth Le Roux, Gerard Bester, Irene Stephanou and many more). FATC has consistently collaborated with performers, choreographers, educators and theatre practitioners to present top quality theatre and training programs at both a national and an international level.

FATC and its collaborating artist have repeatedly been recognized for their excellence in the field of contemporary South African choreography and performance through numerous awards and nominations. FATC has committed itself to creating contemporary South African dance theatre that focuses on questioning and investigating critical personal and social issues. As a result of this work FATC has become acknowledged as South Africa’s leading contemporary dance company in addressing the overwhelming presence of HIV and AIDS in contemporary South African society. FATC has been referred to as a leading voice in the emergence of the new South African “protest/struggle” and issue based dance theatre.

FATC has recently begun enjoying a busy international touring season and exchange projects with performances and residencies in Russia, Holland, Mexico, Tanzania, Mali, Madagascar, Mozambique, Reunion Islands, France and Taiwan.  Furthermore, individual company member are also enjoying growing international solo performance opportunities.  FATC has been integral in launching the professional careers of artist such as the International celebrated Dada Masilo.

PJ Sabbagha is a South African choreographer whose name has become synonymous with issue based dance theatre and more specifically HIV and AIDS focused art. Sabbagha is founding  member and Artistic Director of The Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative and the Annual When Life Happens: HIV and AIDS arts and Culture. PJ was the recipient of the 2005 Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Dance and the 2006 F.N.B. Dance Umbrella (Gauteng MEC for Arts and Culture) award for Best Choreography for his work Still Here. As well as the 2005 and 2009 awards for Most Outstanding presentation for a new work for The Double Room and Macbeth respectively. Sabbagha has received extensive nominations for the then F.N.B. Vita Awards and the F.N.B.  Dance Umbrella awards. PJ was also nominated for the prestigious Daimler Chrysler Award for dance. Furthermore in 1995 PJ was voted top South African Artist and in the top 10 of The Star Tonight’s annual top 100 South Africans. Sabbagha was also recognized for his contribution to South African Arts and Culture through his nomination for and participation in the Amstel Salute to Success. PJ travelled across the USA as a guest of the US State Department as part of the 2007 International Visitors Leadership Program investigating HIV and Aids and other infectious diseases.  PJ’s work has been shown at festivals and theatres and participated in residencies in Russia, Mexico, Holland, Tanzania, Mali, Mozambique and Taiwan.

 

FATC is consistently dedicated to forging new collaborations and partnerships. This project sees a new collaboration being born across borders and disciplines which truly excites out company and speak to vision of the company past and future. The work promises to be a deeply moving and provocative statement on the issues of Gay Rights in Africa that will combine thought provoking statements with exceptional dance and choreography.

In my life I loved you more @SirNoid #BellsPalsy

Dear friends and other interesting creatures,

A few days ago @SirNoid said he had a constant headache.  He stopped drinking Coke (2l a day) two weeks ago so I didn’t pay much attention as you will show signs of withdrawal. The headache has steadily increased and him asking for pain killers isn’t normal.

Yesterday his lip felt kinda numb on the one side. Looked a bit weird. We went to Douglas’s cricket match and he fell asleep on me.  I am a lovely pillow. He woke up and his eye on the opposite side was drooping.  He looked really worrying and when I insisted, he didn’t fight me on the hospital decision.

Naturally my first thought is stroke.  I took him to Milpark and after spending 5 hours at the hospital,  blood tests,  ECG, brain scans,  drips with steroids and pain meds, etc he was diagnosed with Bell’s Palsy.

Watching him literally change physically in front of my eyes was scary.  I love him. I don’t want anything bad you happen to him.  I don’t want to be without him.  I was panicked,  worried. My phones was dead (both phones and Galaxy pad) so it wasn’t nice feeling cut off from the world. My people live there!
Picked up supper for Douglas and Jenna-Lee home where big sister,  @kylajeanv took over (Thank you babe) as they had already been waiting in the car for some time. One less worry. 

@SirNoid is in good spirits laughing it off while making incredibly weird sounds when he smokes.  I hope he will give that up next. His speech is also a but affected,  so at times he slurs.  A bag of meds later,  we home.  Dion refuses to take time off work and his main talking point remains Clash of Clans. So besides a “funny face”,  he is his usual self.

Dr have said it was caught in the first 72 hours which is great and he has a 50/50 chance off recovery fully.

Medically speaking:

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Bell’s palsy is a form of facial paralysis resulting from a dysfunction of the cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve) causing an inability to control facial muscles on the affected side. Often the eye in the affected side cannot be closed. The eye must be protected from drying up, or the cornea may be permanently damaged resulting in impaired vision. In some cases denture wearers experience some discomfort. The common presentation of this condition is a rapid onset of partial or complete paralysis that often occurs overnight. In rare cases (80%). It is named after Scottish anatomist and Edinburgh graduate Charles Bell, who first described it.

I wish you enough
Wenchy

@FATC_SA H28 a powerful dance tribute to Ugandan #gayrights @UJArtsCentre #H28

FATC H28 LOVE IN A TIME OF HAMMERS

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H28 a powerful dance tribute to Ugandan gay rights

FATC is showcasing a new, thought provoking dance collaboration as a way of bringing awareness of gay rights in Africa to theatre audiences in Johannesburg, for three performances only, from 30 October to 1 November.

“Would I choose to be gay if know I’ll be minority, and be pounded for it?”- David Kato, Ugandan gay rights activist.

The FATC (Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative) is collaborating with the talents of Zimbabwean choreographer Mcintosh Jerahuni, UK-Zimbabwean-Malawian director Melissa Eveleigh and the FATC dance cast, namely Thulani Chauke, Nosiphiwo Samente, Nicholas Aphane, Thabo Kobeli and Charlston Van Rooyen, to bring a striking new piece of social commentary through dance, to the stage. And, it will question everything we know about minority rights and more specifically gay rights in Africa.

The collaborative piece titled H28 – Love in a time of hammers, forms part of the UJAC’s That so Gay Fest 2014 and is dedicated to Ugandan gay rights activist David Kato, who was a spirited activist, with a vibrant and courageous approach to his work and life. His ultimate dream was to turn his mother’s cassava farm into a gay village, whilst his society wished him dead. Tragically, this wish became a sad reality in 2011 when the ‘Kill the Gays’ bill was being tabled – Kato had sued the local Ugandan newspaper, Rolling Stone, for publishing photographs of people it labelled as gay with the headline “Hang them”.  Just after his success in court he was gruesomely bludgeoned to death with a hammer and, while the police found no connection, many still believe his death was the result of vigilante gay-bashing.

Fast forward to February 2014 and Uganda has passed a new anti-homosexuality bill toughening the penalties for gay people. The proposed bill included the death penalty for ‘repeat offenders’ and ‘aggravated’ homosexual acts, as well as imprisonment for those found guilty of not reporting gay people to the police. This has started a frenzied media campaign to ‘out’ and shame gay people, and carries with it fearful and ignorant rumours about homosexuals in the country.

Inspired by Kato and the situation in Uganda and using it as a starting point, the FATC created H28 to challenge homophobic perceptions. The piece explores the personal and political conditions in which lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender people live in Africa. It depicts an assortment of mad contradictions and poignant possibilities at a crucial frontier of human rights on the continent.

Funded by RMB, Pro Helvetia SDC Ant Funding and BASA, H28 is yet another powerful and shocking FATC- inspired socially-conscious dance narrative, which will bring to stage a provocative awareness of injustice in the world.

Since inception in 1995, FATC and its collaborative artists have been repeatedly recognised for their excellence in the field of contemporary South African choreography and performance through numerous awards and nominations. The prolific company is best known for its thought-provoking dance pieces depicting personal and social issues, and has often been referred to as a leading voice in the emergence of the new South African “protest/struggle” theatre. FATC has also been instrumental in collaborating with an extensive number of South Africa’s leading contemporary dance professionals and partnered with some impressive dance and theatre companies. The company has presented works abroad bringing audiences to their feet in countries as far afield as Russia, Holland and Mexico, to name some.

FATC founding member and artistic director PJ Sabbagha is a South African talent whose name has become synonymous with issue-based dance theatre and more specifically HIV and AIDS-focused art. He was the recipient of the 2005 Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Dance and the 2006 FNB Dance Umbrella (Gauteng MEC for Arts and Culture) Award for Best Choreography for his work Still Here. He has received numerous other awards and nominations for his works, including being voted top South African Artist in 1995 as well as being in the top 10 of the Star Tonight’s annual top 100 South Africans. To add to his endless list of achievements, PJ travelled across the USA as a guest of the US State Department to participate on the 2007 International Visitors Leadership Program investigating HIV-AIDS and other infectious diseases. His dance works have been shown at festivals and theatres all over the world while he has participated in residencies in Russia, Mexico, Holland, Tanzania, Mali, Mozambique and Taiwan.

“The H28 project sees a new collaboration being born across borders and disciplines, which truly excites FATC and speaks to the vision of the company’s past and future,” says Sabbagha. “The work promises to be a deeply moving and a provocative statement on the issues of Gay Rights in Africa, combining thought-provoking statements with exceptional dance and choreography.”

Over the past 4 years FATC has initiated numerous Residency opportunities that have created a platform for emerging and experienced choreographers to create work with the company.  These include Athena Mazarakis (SA), Gaby Saranouffi (Madagascar), Shanell Winlock (SA), Eric Languet (Reunion Island), Nadine Joseph (SA), Themba Mbuli (SA), Ivan Estegneev and Evguene Kuligan (Russia), Fana Tshabalala (SA) and Mcintosch Jerahuni (Zimbabwe) and Melissa Eveleigh (UK).

ABOUT THE H28 CHOREOGRAPHER AND DIRECTOR

Zimbabwean born choreographer Mcintosch Jerahuni is also a talented musician and dancer. He received his training and experience at Savannah Arts, where he practised traditional dance; Zvishamiso Arts, where he learnt the art of dance while working with choreographer Brian Geza; and the Dance Foundation, where he learnt multiple dance and performance disciplines. While training at the Dance Foundation, he developed a keen eye for choreography and created his first piece, a solo called Runyararo, which premiered at the Harare lnternational Festival of the Arts (HIFA) in 2009. He is currently working with Tumbuka Dance Company, where he has choreographed two works. He has also established Jerahuni Movement Factory, a community arts project. As a musician, Jerahuni plays the mbira instrument while leading his Jerahuni band.

Award-winning UK Director/writer and accomplished development practitioner Melissa Eveleigh has lived and worked in Southern Africa since 2002. Melissa co-founded and ran the national arts and development NGO, Nanzikambe Arts, in Malawi from 2004-2010. More recently she established the Arts Lab, a cultural development programme for performers in Zimbabwe. She wrote and produced an award-winning dance-theatre production titled Can’t Talk About This, which played at the Grahamstown National Arts Festival in 2013. Eveleigh trained in physical theatre at LISPA (The London International School of Performing Arts) and has extensively used the arts as communication for education, therapysexual and reproductive rights, health, human rights, and most recently, for legal rights with the GIZ Rule of Law programme in Bangladesh.

H28 – Love in a time of hammers will be staged in Johannesburg at the Con Cowan Theatre. There will be three performances only – 30 October at 7.30pm, 31 October at 7.30pm and 1 November at 3pm. Tickets cost R50 and can be booked via pj@forgottenangle.co.za or purchased at the door.

Please note there is an age restriction of 16 years and under.

For more details visit www.forgottenangle.co.za or find the FATC on facebook.

@reading_house Review cc @AlbetNoble @TripAdvisor

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Dear friends and other interesting creatures, 

Reading House is a beautifully restored and furnished guest house that catered for my every need during my week long stay.

From the delectable breakfasts prepared by the Manager and Chef Albert, to the huge bath to the cool cotton sheets… A warm gown and chocolate waiting on your pillow.

The attention to detail is German in its precision. Albert seems to remember your every preference and caters for it. Truly outstanding service, especially when I realised how small their staff compliment is!

I loved that there was no TV in my bedroom as I feel it would interfere with the charm of the venue. (There is a TV room, well stocked with DVD’s etc should you wish to watch TV. My self service coffee and tea station was always well stocked, as was my bath salts and all toiletries on offer. My bedroom and bathroom was very well kept, not a speck of dust and I appreciated the warm bath towels. Luxury without the price cringe.

I became ill during my stay and Albert truly went beyond what can be expected. I was both humbled and thankful. Grateful to have arrived a visitor, and having left as a friend.

Reading House has the potential to become an exclusive Boutique Hotel with its unique rich heritage, location and tranquility but above all – individual service. Reading House could easily provide conference facilities for small groups of Executives who require exceptional personal attention, and demand quality.

A great venue for morning tea’s or just popping in for a five star breakfast (I would imagine you need to make a reservation). Take a book with you to Reading House… You will find yourself not wanting to leave!

Reading House in Newlands, Cape Town comes highly recommended. I only wished the weather was warm enough for me to have enjoyed their pool. Next time!

I wish you enough,
Wenchy

As posted on TripAdvisor.